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Thesis defense schedule

Here’s the schedule for the theses defense (all deliberations to be held at the CHSS Conference Room):

  • Wednesday, 6 February, 10:00-11:30 a.m. — Mary Grace E. Galenzoga, “The Eden Summer Enrichment Program of Eden Nature Park: A CSR Evaluation” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser)
  • Wednesday, 6 February, 2:30-4:00 p.m. — Datu Nasser A. Pendatun, Jr., “An Environmental Scan on the Public Relations Tactics and Community Relations of Eden Nature Park and Resort” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser) Postponed to Thursday, 7 February, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
  • Thursday, 7 February, 2:30-4:00 p.m. — May Che B. Capili, “Impact Evaluation of the NCCC Cares Educational Assistance Program: A Case Study” (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)
  • Friday, 8 February, 2:30-4:00 p.m. — Honey Jane A. Wong, “Perception of Employees Toward DLPC Through Its Memoranda” (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)
  • Monday, 11 February, 1:00-2:30 p.m. — Gian Alexis Abian, “Identifying the Mindanao Conflict Agenda of Mindanao Daily Mirror and Mindanao Times” (Prof. Antonino Salvador S. de Veyra, Adviser)
  • Tuesday, 12 February, 1:00-2:30 p.m. — Sittie Mohmina A. Guinomla, “The Customers’ Perceptions Regarding the Various Messages on Pearl Farm Beach Resort’s Press Releases in Newspapers” (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)
  • Wednesday, 13 February, 2:30-4:00 p.m. — Rosa May C. Young, “A Critique on the Appropriateness of the PR Tools of Eden Nature Park with regard to the Demographic Characteristics of the Visitors” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser)
  • Thursday, 14 February, 1:00-2:30 p.m. — Margilie C. Demerin, “Sasa Airport Bombing” (Dr. Anne Marie Jennifer E. Eligio, Adviser) Postponed to Wednesday, 5 March, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
  • Friday, 15 February, 1:00-2:30 p.m. — Felix Doyle T. Abrio, “Audience Preference for Noontime TV Shows of Mintal Residents” (Prof. Antonino Salvador S. de Veyra, Adviser)
  • Monday, 18 February, 1:00-2:30 p.m. — Abigail C. Boluso, “Effects of PR Tools on the Attitudes and Motivations of the Apo View Hotel of Davao Employees (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)
  • Tuesday, 19 February, 1:00-2:30 p.m. — Rezsa L. Montibon, “The Decision-making Process of the Sangguniang Panlungsod of the City Government of Davao City in Making City Ordinances” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser) Postponed to Wednesday, 27 February, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday, 20 February, 2:30-4:00 — Conrad Dominic G. Abellanosa, “Responses of the Employees of DASIA Towards Their Work in Relation to Their Perceived Corporate Image through Rating Scales” (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser) Postponed to Thursday, 28 February, 10:00-11:00 a.m.
  • Thursday, 21 February, 2:30-4:00 p.m. — Lucky April M. Ebrole, “The Correlation of Message Perception, Audience’s Demographic Profile and Length of Exposure to Local Herbal Ads on Television” (Ms. Sheila Grace D. Bulaong, Adviser) Postponed to Monday, 3 March, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
  • Monday, 25 February, 1:00-2:30 p.m. — Mary Charlen P. Suedad, “Study of the Effectiveness of the Strategies Used by UAVFI in Presenting Their Project to the Ubo Community of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser) Postponed to Tuesday, 4 March, 1:30-2:30 p.m.
  • Thursday, 6 March, 1:30-2:30 p.m.Gayorgor, Hanna Mae B. “Barangay 1296: A Content Analysis of a Public Service Program on DXAB 1296, ABS-CBN Davao” (Ms. Sheila Grace D. Bulaong, Adviser)

Format for printing final draft will be presented on Wednesday, 6 February 2008. Approval sheets will be distributed to successful examinees upon return of final draft.

Please take note of the following important dates:

  • Submission of final revisions – three weeks after defense (February 27 – March 21, 2008)
  • Submission of bound copies of Thesis – March 28, 2008
  • Submission of final (numerical) grade – April 1, 2008

Choosing your thesis topic

Beginnings are usually the most difficult phases to get through. Especially when you think of your THESIS as a Damocles’ sword hanging by an unraveling thread over your head.

As you mull over several ideas running around like crazy in your head, and as the clock keeps ticking closer towards the deadline, you can’t help but hyperventilate.

Perhaps you need to take a deep breath, and remind yourself that your research proposal is really a documentation or a record of your search process.

So what is this process? Bouma and Atkinson (1995) say the research process involves three (3) phases:

  • Clarification of issue and selection of research method
  • Collection of evidence related to the research question/hypothesis
  • Analysis and interpretation of collected evidence

    Your research proposal will deal only with Phase 1. That’s a relief, right? For most of the time this semester, you’ll only be doing this part of your thesis.

    So let’s take it one step at a time, then. One section of each chapter at a time.

    Chapter 1 of the research proposal, from the “Rationale” to the “Significance of the Study,” involves the first item under Phase 1 — clarification of the research issue/problem. We will deal with the second item, selection of research method, when we get to Chapter 2.

    Clarifying the research issue/problem involves three (3) basic activities (Bouma & Atkinson, 1995):

    • Selection of a research topic
    • Narrowing down the topic
    • Formulating the research problem

      Let’s proceed with activity number one first. We’ll need to recall some basic concepts we learned in AH 2 (Exploring Ideas through Academic Writing) or in ENG 10 (Technical/Scientific Writing) for this activity.

      In choosing a topic for research, we learned to consider these guidelines (Rosen and Behrens, 1994):

      • Preliminary readings, starting with general references (encyclopedias, specialized encyclopedias, textbooks, etc.) to more specific sources in a particular field may yield a topic for research. It is best to take down notes (research log) while doing preliminary readings.
      • Consultations with experts in the field may also provide topics.
      • Topics that are controversial and significant are good topics for research; controversial topics will generate differing opinions.
      • “So what” topics are not good for research. These include topics that yield a “so what” response from readers because they already know the subject.
      • Initial questions about the chosen “preliminary” topic may result in a good research topic. Questions may include journalists’ questions (five Ws and one H) or topical questions.
      • An alternative involves listing down concepts related to the topic. These concepts may be clustered and relationships among concepts may be mapped (see example below).
      • Asking initial or topical questions and clustering and mapping concepts will also help narrow down a topic. In the figure below, for example, the topic on “drug abuse” has been narrowed down to “counseling and treatment programs for college students with alcohol-abuse problems.”
      • A “preliminary thesis” or a “judgment” on a topic will help focus and narrow down a research topic. For example, the thesis for the narrowed-down topic above may be stated this way: “The identities of college students seeking counseling or treatment for alcohol abuse should be kept highly confidential to ensure the success of such programs.”

      topic-cluster-map.jpg

      Of course, your choice of a topic will have to fall under certain communication disciplines (remember, you’re doing this for your Comm. Arts degree). Your choices should be contextualized under the fields of:

      • Mass communication/media arts
      • Organizational communication/speech communication
      • Other areas of communication related to the previous two fields

      Following any or combinations of the above contexts, your thesis topic for research may be found through observations of and/or readings on, to name just a few:

      • Social problems (global warming, etc.)
      • General themes/behaviors (voting behavior, etc.)
      • Bodies of theory (attitude change, etc.)

      You may find Communication: Ubiquitous, Complex, Consequential (2001) — listed under “Readings” in the Links sidebar — an interesting source for exciting topics. Check it out.

      What you’ll be looking for is a topic that can be transformed into a good research problem. What is a good research problem?

      Smith (1988) says: “A good research problem usually addresses the relationship [may be implicit] between or among classes of communication phenomena, has theoretical import (meaning it is concerned with explanation), and is verifiable by empirical observation.”

      So, for instance, based on your viewing of An Inconvenient Truth (which you know is within the context of media arts), a documentary on climate change (a significant social problem in these times), you decide to work on the topic: “The role of media in raising public awareness of climate change.”

      To be continued…

      Orientation

      Welcome to our Communication Arts Thesis (COMA 200) course blog.

      COMA 200 is a six-unit thesis writing course divided into two terms (with three units credit per term). You take this course once you’ve taken and passed COMA 192 (Research in Communication Arts) and if you’ve earned enough credits for Senior standing.

      The first term is devoted to finishing the thesis proposal, which you may have started working on in COMA 192, and successfully defending it before the panel of Communication Arts faculty. You may also start on your data collection during the first term after the panel has approved your proposal.

      The second term of COMA 200 is devoted to data collection, data analysis, and to finishing and defending your final thesis.

      After this orientation, you will choose a thesis adviser (please refer to About COMA 200 for the list of advisers) with whom you will be closely working with in the preparation of your thesis proposal and final paper.

      Please provide the BACA Program Coordinator (yours truly, for this semester) your choice for thesis adviser — that is, after you have gotten your adviser’s consent.

      Parts of the final thesis

      Your final thesis should contain the following:

      • Approval sheet
      • Title page
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment page
      • Table of Contents
      • List of Figures (if applicable)
      • Chapter 1 — Research Problem
        • Rationale
        • Review of Related Literature
        • Statement of the Problem
        • Objectives of the Study
        • Conceptual and Theoretical Framework
        • Significance of the Study
      • Chapter 2 — Research Methodology
        • Research Design
        • Variable Specifications
        • Elements and Sampling Methods
        • Procedure
        • Method of Data Analysis
      • Chapter 3 — Results and Discussion
      • Chapter 4 — Summary, Conclusion, and Recommendations
      • References
      • Appendices

      Parts of the thesis proposal

      Your thesis proposal should contain the following:

      • Title page
      • Abstract
      • Chapter 1 — Research Problem
        • Rationale
        • Review of Related Literature
        • Statement of the Problem
        • Objectives of the Study
        • Conceptual and Theoretical Framework
        • Significance of the Study
      • Chapter 2 — Research Methodology
        • Research Design
        • Variable Specifications
        • Elements and Sampling Methods
        • Procedure
        • Method of Data Analysis
      • References

      The final research proposal will be evaluated using the following rubric, with 70% rating for substance and 30% rating for structure and format. The rubric is divided into 15 items, with the items from Research Title to References and the items from Results to Summary, Conclusion, and Recommendations used as bases for rating the substance of the research work, and with the items from Coherence, Unity, and Development to Mechanics and Format used for rating the structure and format of both the thesis proposal and the final thesis. The parameters under each item will be used in scoring the work according to the following scale: Poor (0 points), Lacking (1 point), Satisfactory (2 points), Good (3 points), Very Good (4 points), and Excellent (5 points).

      The parameters include the following:

      Thesis Proposal

      • Research Title
        • Extent by which title encapsulates the focus/major variables of the study
      • Rationale
        • Provides adequate background information on the research topic
        • Provides justification for choice of research topic
      • Review of Related Literature
        • Provides historical background of key concepts/variables
        • Provides comprehensive discussion (reflecting in-depth search) of appropriate and relevant theories and studies related to the research topic
        • Provides subtopics/subheadings that reflect state-of-the-art focus of the study
        • Provides summary of trend and/or gap in related literature
        • Provides a good argument that leads to the research problem for investigation
      • Statement of the Problem
        • Research question/s or hypothesis is clearly and precisely stated
        • Research question/s or hypothesis includes general and specific statements
        • Research question/s or hypothesis reflects relationships between/among key concepts/variables
        • Research question/s or hypothesis leads to implications/predictions
      • Objectives
        • Statements of general and specific objectives reflect problem statements
        • Statements of general and specific objectives reflect relationships between/among key concepts/variables
        • Statements of general and specific objectives are SMART
      • Conceptual and Theoretical Framework
        • Framework identifies key concepts/variables
        • Framework reflects relationships between/among key concepts/variables
        • Framework specifies how key concepts/variables are interrelated
        • Framework identifies and specifies units of measurement for key concepts/variables
      • Significance of the Study
        • Statements reflect how the investigation of the research problem will contribute to the body of knowledge
      • Methodology
        • Research design
          • Research plan is discussed in detail (taking into consideration the eight different classificatory pairs)
          • Research plan is adequately justified in relation to specified research question/s or hypothesis
          • Research plan is internally and externally valid
        • Variable specification
          • Comprehensively discusses independent and dependent variables
          • Comprehensively discusses the validity and reliability of variables
        • Elements and sampling method
          • Respondents/participants of the study are comprehensively specified and discussed
          • Sampling scheme is comprehensively specified and discussed
          • Research instruments are comprehensively specified and discussed
        • Procedure
          • Research procedure is comprehensively described through a step-by-step narrative from initiation to completion of the data collection process
        • Method of data analysis
          • Method of data analysis is comprehensively specified and discussed
          • Method of data analysis chosen is justified in relation to the research question/s or hypothesis or in relation to the research objectives
      • Bibliography/References/Works Cited
        • Sources cited in the body of the text consistently follow the prescribed and appropriate parenthetical or footnote/endnote format
        • Sources listed reflect a comprehensive search of related literature
        • Sources listed consistently follow the prescribed and appropriate bibliographic format
      • Coherence, Unity, and Development
        • Sentences in paragraphs are coherent and are unified around a central and fully-developed controlling idea
        • Paragraphs within sections are coherent and are unified around a central and fully-developed controlling idea
        • Sections within parts of the whole paper are coherent and are unified around a central and fully-developed controlling idea
        • Parts of the whole papers are coherent and are unified around a central and fully-developed controlling idea
      • Language Use
        • Language used is appropriate to the discipline
        • Sentence construction is grammatically correct
        • Sentence construction is clear and balanced
        • Sentence construction shows appropriate variety
      • Mechanics and Format
        • Conventions in spelling and punctuation are followed
        • Conventions in numerical and graphical presentations are followed
        • Conventions of prescribed format are followed (including approval sheet, title page, abstract, contents page, and list of tables and/or figures)

      Final Thesis

      (Parameters from “Research Title” to “Mechanics and Format” are used to reevaluate Chapters 1-4 and the Bibliography/References/Works Cited as well as the Appendices sections of the final thesis, especially in relation to the necessary revisions done.)

      • Results
        • Comprehensively presents a description of research findings pertinent to the research question/s or hypothesis — including statistical analyses, if any, and their significance levels
        • Comprehensively reports validity checks on variables
        • Comprehensively displays and explains tables and figures presented
      • Discussion
        • Presents a concise discussion of major findings and confirmation of research question/s or hypothesis posed
        • Presents a comprehensive explanation and justification of the reasonableness of results in terms of relevant theory and past research findings
        • Presents a comprehensive discussion of the theoretical, methodological, and practical implications and significance of research results in relation to relevant theory and past research findings
      • Summary, Conclusion, and Recommendations
        • Presents a concise summary of the research problem, objectives, and the methodology employed
        • Presents a concise summary of research findings
        • Presents a concise discussion of the theoretical, methodological, and practical recommendations based on research results and in relation to relevant theory and past research findings

      Here’s the schedule for presentations of the first batch (1st Semester, AY 2007-2008) of thesis proposals:

      August 22, Wednesday (4:00-5:30 p.m., Rm. 105)

      Pendatun, Datu Nasser Jr. A. “Determining the Trends of the Public Relations Tactics and Community Relations of Eden Nature Park by Conducting an Environmental Scan of its Target Markets and Immediate Surrounding Communities” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser)

      August 23, Thursday (10-11:30 a.m., CHSS Conference Rm.)

      Young, Rosa May C. “A Critique on the Appropriateness of the PR Tools of Eden Nature Park with regard to the Demographic Characteristics of the Visitors” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser)

      Capili, May Che B. “Impact Evaluation of the NCCC Cares Educational Assistance Program” (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)

      August 24, Friday (10-11:30 a.m., CHSS Conference Rm.)

      Galenzoga, Mary Grace E. “A Social Audit on the Corporate Social Responsibility Program of Eden Nature Park” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser)

      Suedad, Mary Charlen P. “Study of the Effectiveness of the Strategies Used by UAVFI in Presenting Their Project to the Ubo Community of Lake Sebu, South Cotabato” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser)

      August 28, Tuesday (10-11:30 a.m., CHSS Conference Rm.)

      Guinomla, Sittie Mohmina A. “The Customers’ Perceptions Regarding the Various Messages on Pearl Farm Beach Resort’s Press Releases in Newspapers” (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)

      Boluso, Abigail C. “Effects of PR Tools on the Attitudes and Motivations of the Apo View Hotel of Davao Employees (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)

      August 29, Wednesday (4:00-5:30 p.m., CHSS Conference Rm.)

      Abellanosa, Conrad Dominic G. “Responses of the Employees of DASIA Towards Their Work in Relation to Their Perceived Corporate Image through Rating Scales” (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)

      Wong, Honey Jane A. “Perception of Employees Toward DLPC Through Its Memoranda” (Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)

      August 30, Thursday (10-11:30 a.m., CHSS Conference Rm.)

      Gayorgor, Hanna Mae B. “Barangay 1296: A Content Analysis of a Public Service Program on DXAB 1296, ABS-CBN Davao” (Ms. Sheila Grace D. Bulaong, Adviser)

      Abian, Gian Alexis I. “Content Analysis of Mindanao Daily Mirror and Mindanao Times and Their Coverage of the Mindanao Conflict” (Prof. Antonino Salvador S. de Veyra, Adviser)

      September 4, Tuesday (10-11:30 a.m., CHSS Conference Rm.)

      Abrio, Felix Doyle T. “Audience Preference for Noontime TV Shows of Mintal Residents” (Prof. Antonino Salvador S. de Veyra, Adviser)

      Ebrole, Luck April M. “The Correlation of Message Perception, Audience’s Demographic Profile and Length of Exposure to Local Herbal Ads on Television” (Ms. Sheila Grace D. Bulaong, Adviser)

      September 5, Wednesday (10-11:30 a.m., CHSS Conference Rm.)

      Demerin, Margilie C. “Sasa Airport Bombing” (Dr. Anne Marie Jennifer E. Eligio/Prof. Karen Joyce G. Cayamanda, Adviser)

      Montibon, Rezsa L. “The Decision-making Process of the Sangguniang Panlungsod of the City Government of Davao City in Making City Ordinances” (Mr. Dennis John F. Sumaylo, Adviser)

      September 6, Thursday (10-11:30 a.m., CHSS Conference Rm.)

      Neri, Krisna Athena C. “Negotiation between PMDC and the Residents of Brgy. New Leyte with the Planned Reopening of the Previous NDMC” (Dr. Anne Marie Jennifer E. Eligio, Adviser)

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